Point Molate needs your attention once again. There is a City Council meeting happening 5:00pm tonight 6/21/2016. In a closed session, the former proposed casino developer Upstream Development will hold a “conference with legal counsel” regarding existing litigation Upstream holds against the City of Richmond. Arrive before 5:00pm and fill out a speaker card to be heard during the brief window for public comment on the value of Point Molate.

Agenda for City Council meeting 6/21 at 5:00pm TODAY

TODAY JUNE 21, 2016

LOCATION: Community Services Building 440 Civic Center Plaza Richmond, CA 94804

TIME: arrive 4:45pm to fill out a speaker card

We are foremost requesting that any plans for Point Molate be open to public process. We are concerned that Upstream Development will present a new housing development plan to City of Richmond in form of a settlement offer. The City may vote and decide to accept the plan, without asking the public. Many times the residents of Richmond have stood up and said they don’t want inappropriate development there, away from many services and closely neighboring the Chevron refinery. Settling now would be a loss to the City on many fronts. See Citizens for Sustainable Point Molate recent blog post: http://www.cfspm.org/

Our organization will advocate firstly, that land use commitments not be made tonight. We will continue with insisting that want to see the most valuable plant communities preserved, that of the watershed area immediately above the Beach Park. (Have you visited the Point Molate Beach Park on Stenmark Drive yet, which is maintained by volunteers and open to the public?) We believe the best use of this area is as park land, and needs boundary protections for flora from Coastal Prairie bunch grasses stretching all the way up the hillside, to the eel grass beds in the bay.

We do not want decisions made tonight on the fate of this beautiful diverse resource, without due opportunity for public process. We fear that a hasty decision will reflect the City’s current hurt for funds and ignore what the public actually wants there.

CONTACT your Richmond City Council Members today, to voice your concerns. Model letters follow which you are welcome to use. All voices are important at this point, even if you are not a Richmond resident. If Point Molate is important to you we value you adding your voice.

Please help us shed light on Richmond. Thank you. Hope to see you at the meeting tonight.
Sincerely,

Karen Whitestone
Conservation Analyst
East Bay California Native Plant Society

510.734.0335

conservation@ebcnps.org

 

LETTERS:

Pt. Molate Alert – East Bay CNPS, Conservation Committee

Below are Council email addresses and samples to reach Richmond City Council prior to the closed-door session on Pt. Molate, Tues. 5pm

tom.butt@intres.com          natbates@comcast.net               jovanka_beckles@ci.richmond.ca.us     eduardo_martinez@ci.richmond.ca.us                       gayle@definingourdestiny.net      jael_myrick@ci.richmond.ca.us                               vinay_pimple@ci.richmond.ca.us

cc: <conservation@ebcnps.org>

Subject: Open and Public Planning Process for Pt. Molate (short version if you just have a moment)

Please do not make any land use commitments to Upstream or any other developer in closed door session. We ask you to initiate an open and public planning process for zoning of land use at Pt. Molate.

Sincerely,

Richmond resident, member of California Native Plant Society, East Bay Chapter

Subject: Open and Public Planning Process for Pt. Molate (longer version).

This Tuesday, June 21, at 5 p.m. the members of the Richmond City Council will be reviewing in closed session a lawsuit against the City by the casino developer, Upstream Development. Upstream Development has been approaching the City recently, and it is feared that they are trying to obtain Council member approval to build a big housing development in the diverse and ecologically-rich south watershed basin that surrounds the Pt. Molate Beach Park. Their

Housing development in Pt. Molate’s south watershed was one of the proposals rejected by the Richmond voters in November, 2010 when we voted overwhelmingly against Upstream’s project, including the casino. Also, recent business expert advice sought by the City wisely recommends concentrating any development in the Winehaven area, reserving the south watershed as parkland due to its amazing ecological diversity and future value to all Richmond residents.

The City has not yet done a public planning process to codify land use zoning at Pt. Molate. Zoning is a public process and precedes any approval of land use.

We ask that the City Council initiate a public planning process so Richmond residents have a say on land uses at Pt. Molate, and that the Council make no land use commitments until a public planning process for Pt. Molate is completed.

Sincerely,

Richmond resident and member, California Native Plant Society, East Bay Chapter

On 29 March 2016, our chapter’s Conservation Committee gathered at a volunteer’s private home to discuss current native plant conservation issues in the East Bay Area. Here is an outline of our main topics:

  • Antioch, CA: Vineyards at Sand Creek development: Several of our volunteers have attended public meetings to understand the impacts of this housing plan on our Four Valleys Botanical Priority Protection Area (BPPA) (map), southeast of the Black Diamond Mines Regional Preserve. The City of Antioch and Antioch Planning Commission is deciding how to embrace this idea for a Highway 4 gated private residential community, also called the Sand Creek Focus Area. Unfortunately, Antioch decided several years ago not to participate in the East Contra Costa County Habitat Conservation Plan (HCP). This particular valley is an important remainder of a once larger east-west migration corridor for plants and animals.
  • Richmond, CA: Point Molate: Conflicts over land use are settling, and this beautiful area is receiving broom removal treatments. The Urban Land Institute recently delivered six future plan alternatives to Richmond City Council, including two favoring total parks or mixed use with public parks and only some housing. This would be great news compared to the alternative of a casino discussed several years ago. It is concerning to note that City of Richmond plans to perform rezoning in the area as early as this week. Our chapter’s objective is to maintain the native vegetation corridor as much as possible from hilltop to beach and eel grass beds beyond. We favor continued public recreational enjoyment of the beautiful Point Molate with simultaneous protection of native plants. The Bay Trail Commission is in planning stages for making a connection through the area, as well.
  • East Bay Regional Parks District and fuels treatments: Our chapter continues to express worry about unclear management protocols for areas like the Huckleberry Preserve, specifically for care of sensitive maritime chaparral and the endangered pallid manzanita (Arctostaphylos pallida). We are working cooperatively with the Parks District on clarifying that forthcoming vegetation management plan. Additionally, we excerpted from their current Wildfire Hazard Reduction and Resource Management Plan for discussing how native plant protections are framed in contract language grazing guidelines, in other regions where fuel breaks are needed.
  • Oakland, CA: Knowland Park addition to Oakland Zoo:  The East Bay Zoological Society is building its California Trail project, but several of our volunteers noted enough (17) permit violations to merit an impressive letter to California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) asking for immediate action to protect remaining rare plant communities and Alameda Whipsnake habitat, including independent monitoring, penalty fee collection for mitigation, and beginning weed removal. We have not received a reply yet from CDFW.

 

Brief updates

– Hilltop Drive, Richmond: One of our volunteers noted construction spoils and indiscriminate herbicide spraying on native grasslands off of this Highway 80 exit.

– Point Pinole, Richmond: Wildlife populations may be declining due to drought or park management practices, including vegetation management.

– Berkeley Global Campus, Richmond: Construction plans are currently paused, which gives us the opportunity to learn more about the native flora and prairie grasslands.

 

Our Conservation Chair Jean Robertson led the meeting and kept our discussions focused. Want to get involved with our committee meetings? We love having more hands on deck! Please contact myself, or our Conservation Chair Jean Robertson (conservation-chair@ebcnps.org). Let us know  briefly what conservation projects in your area you are interested in contributing to, and what skills you can volunteer.

The Conservation Committee will meet again on 26 April, 2016.

Participate in field trips with our chapter from our Meetup page.

Read more conservation updates from our April 2016 chapter newsletter, the Bay Leaf.

 

Karen Whitestone

Conservation Analyst

conservation@ebcnps.org

On 19 February 2016, our organization participated in an Environmental Advisory Council hosted by Assemblywoman Catharine Baker. About thirty representatives from other conservation and land management organizations, park districts, municipalities, and nonprofits around the East Bay Area attended to represent our top important issues to Baker over a two hour period. I represented our chapter by reiterating our stance on the value of the Tesla area. Most of the others also used this council gathering as a platform to state that Tesla contains many more possibilities than an off-highway vehicle (OHV) recreation park expansion. Additionally, many agreed that the Environmental Impact Report (EIR) did not appropriately address extensive evidence submitted that OHV use is inappropriate for an area containing so many biological and botanical treasures. I delivered copies of the letter we delivered to the Off-Highway Motor Vehicle Recreation (OHMVR) Commission on 05 February 2016, plus a map and description of our Corral Hollow Botanical Priority Protection Area (BPPA).

The Tesla debate is not news to our readers. In fact, this issue was not news to Ms. Baker, either. She supports keeping open space for varied recreation, especially in support of healthy lifestyle education. She responded to many points, and spoke briefly to us on her engagement with the Carnegie park employees. As of this date since the meeting, we have not heard her take a public, political stance on the Tesla expansion.

In related news, the OHMVR Commission has further delayed deciding on the Tesla expansion. The Carnegie State Vehicular Recreation Area (SVRA) General Plan Team emailed a project update on 18 March 2016, to those who signed up for that free service on their website. The team is incorporating feedback received from the 05 February 2016 meeting in Tracy, CA, which will then be published as the Draft General Plan and Final EIR to the project website. The OHMVR Commission will set a date to meet again and consider approval. The meeting will be public, and preceded by a 30-day public notice. This is great news, because it indicates that the 60 speakers and large volume of submitted written comments inspired the Commission to wait to vote on approval until another round of revisions could be assimilated into the document. We look forward to investigating these revisions when it is published sometime in Summer 2016.

Baker represents California’s Assembly District 16, which stretches from Orinda over to Walnut Creek, to Livermore and further South. The Carnegie SVRA falls neatly within her constituency boundary. Baker plans to convene Environmental Advisory Council meetings every six months or so, throughout her elected term.

Our organization’s mission declares important goals for promoting and protecting native California plants. We primarily do this by increasing understanding among the public of the importance of our native plants, and providing reliable information in support of their conservation. I enjoyed the opportunity to engage with our elected official to present reliable information on Tesla, for the possibility of influencing public policy and opinion.

We encourage you to engage, as well. Attend a city council or utility district public meeting to learn about your local projects and issues. Elected officials want to hear from the people they represent, and these days, many host informal hikes or coffee groups to inspire candid conversation. Share native plant news or events with us as you hear about them, we will spread the word, and we may see each other at a meeting!

 

Upcoming Events:

04/23/2016: Walk and Talk with Assemblywoman Baker

05/22/2016: Pelican Dreams fundraiser benefiting Save Tesla Park

 

A brief update on the Meeting of the Off Highway Motor Vehicle Recreation (OHMVR) Commission, taking place at Tracy City Hall, regarding planned expansion project into the Tesla area, as proposed by Carnegie State Vehicular Recreation Area (SVRA):

On Friday, February 5th, 2016, many local organizations and members of the public stood up with EBCNPS at the OHMVR Commission Meeting. We spoke out on the Carnegie SVRA General Plan and proposed expansion into the Tesla area. Passion was high at this event, the last opportunity for public comment on this project. Sticker badges of “I Own Carnegie” contrasted with “Save Tesla Park” around the room. Most importantly, a majority of speakers remained adamantly opposed, and submitted succinct opposition comments into public record.

Please read EBCNPS’ submitted comments from the Commission Meeting, stating that this Proposed Final Environmental Impact Report (EIR) lacks appropriate consideration of important evidence previously submitted in full. The true effects of the General Plan and Final EIR on botanical resources continue to be misjudged, to the point of failing to satisfy California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) requirements. We asserted, yet again, that these Proposed Final EIR  and General Plan documents should not be certified or approved.

As Conservation Analyst, I represented EBCNPS at this meeting. I spoke to summarize important points from our submitted comment letter. We attached our Corral Hollow Botanical Priority Protection Areas (BPPA) map with description, and a Special- Status Species and Habitat Occurrences on Tesla Expansion Area map, which specifically illustrates a talking point on curly blue grass grassland, a rare natural community. This grassland is recognized by California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) and depicted as up to 175 acres in size on the special- status map. It is unclear why the coarse vegetation mapping used for their impact analysis overlooks these and other botanical and cultural resources.

In fact, we recommended that the Tesla area is so very significant as to merit a “sensitive area” recognition as defined by Public Resources Code, to serve as permanent mitigation for ongoing impacts of OHV use at the existing Carnegie SVRA. I also reinforced in comments that EBCNPS thinks Tesla should be permanently preserved with no OHV use.

As you analyze these documents for yourself, please keep in mind that delaying the planning of smaller projects as part of a program- level planning process is an over- generalized approach in this case, inadequately accounting for the summary impact of small projects on the whole Tesla area. Where there could be significant impacts to resources requiring legal protection, appropriate steps to analyze those impacts must be taken, and definitely were not taken by this Proposed Final EIR. Any small project would undeniably effect the whole. Steps to ensure complete analysis is performed before action would be taken on the expansion plan are also not outlined. The only impact deemed significant and unavoidable by this Proposed Final EIR is that on air quality, which is not supported by the evidence we and many other groups submitted. We are thrilled that so many others agreed with us.

Reporting on this event included The Independent’s article summary of the “sharp criticism” for the Tesla expansion plan, and, an article on how to understand the fuel tax allocation source of funding for the purchase of Tesla property by Carnegie SVRA in the 1990s.

Small victory that the OHMVR Commission did not vote on the General Plan and Proposed Final EIR at this meeting! What can we do now? Within 6 months, the Commission will decide whether to approve the General Plan and EIR. Hopefully, they will take extensive time to consider the resources needing protection on the Tesla property. Please continue to show your support by keeping your ears open about Tesla topics.

If you have the time, read through the FEIR, comments, or appendices. Many groups also made important opposition points backed by valid evidence.

We will await the Commission’s decision, and report back to you.

 

 

 

Greetings, fellow native plant enthusiasts!

My name is Karen Whitestone, and I am the new Conservation Analyst for this East Bay Chapter of the California Native Plant Society (EBCNPS). I am taking over from the productive Mack Casterman. You may have already seen me around, delivering commentary at meetings or visiting our beautiful local open space in the East San Francisco Bay Area. As I get up to speed on worthy projects, please, introduce yourself.

I look forward to meeting and working with you. This blog will be one way you can keep in touch with EBCNPS on hot topics in local conservation. I encourage you to join me at public meetings, where land you and I care about is on the agenda.

Updates forthcoming: Meeting on Draft FEIR for Carnegie SVRA Tesla expansion (2/5/16), EBCNPS Conservation Committee meeting (2/17/16).

Are you in the East Bay, and heard of something happening now? I want to know!

 

Karen Whitestone

Conservation Analyst

East Bay California Native Plant Society

conservation@ebcnps.org

510 734 0335

 

Learn more about EBCNPS here:

What are we doing now? http://ebcnps.org/meetings/

The Bay Leaf arrives monthly: http://ebcnps.org/newsletter/

Where do we care? Check out the Botanical Priority Protection Areas: http://ebcnps.org/guide-botanical-priority-protection-areas-east-bay/botanical-priority-guidebook-mashup/

View of Mt. Diablo from Tesla Park

View of Mt. Diablo from Tesla Park  photo: Mack Casterman

On June 29th, EBCNPS submitted a comment letter in response to the Preliminary General Plan and accompanying Draft Environmental Impact Report for the Carnegie State Vehicular Recreation Area in Eastern Alameda County. This letter is a major step in a multi year process that will continue into the future.

EBCNPS’s concern regarding this plan is that it proposes to expand motorized off road vehicle recreation into a 3,000 acre parcel that is known as Tesla Park. This area is listed as a Botanical Priority Protection Area by EBCNPS, and the plan and its DEIR fail to consider and address the major environmental impacts that would occur if such an expansion was to take place.

Our letter can be viewed here: EBCNPS General Plan_DEIR letter FINAL June 2015 with attachments

The Oakland Zoo recently submitted a request to the City of Oakland for a permit to kill 57 heritage Oaks and other native trees in Knowland Park.  Many many more trees that don’t require a permit to kill will be taken out, and the Zoo acknowledges 481 could be impacted during the construction of the Zoo’s proposed expansion development in the highlands of Knowland Park.

Please join us in writing a formal letter protesting the issuance of this permit. The citizens of Oakland must speak out to make sure that the publicly funded Oakland Zoo is not allowed to destroy these native heritage trees on public park land. These trees make up part of Oakland’s natural heritage and indeed lend their name to the city itself.

The Friends of Knowland Park have made it easy to let your concern be heard by sending the one click letter available at this link:

 http://www.saveknowland.org/tree-removal-objection-letter/

The comment deadline is June 23rd.

Thank you for your help!

We need your help now to SAVE Tesla Park! This is your inspiration…Tesla Park West Ridge to Mount Diablo

Please email your comments on the Carnegie SVRA Preliminary General Plan/Draft EIR (General Plan /DEIR) before the June 29, 2015 deadline.

Your comments can be emailed to CarnegieDEIRcomments@gmail.com .

You can view the documents at www.CarnegieGeneralPlan.com .

Following is a sample comment letter that you can use to prepare your personal email:

To OHMVR Carnegie SVRA General Plan:

The Carnegie SVRA Preliminary General Plan and Draft EIR do not protect the sensitive resources in the expansion area, also referred to as the Alameda-Tesla property or Tesla.  The General Plan and DEIR may provide Carnegie SVRA the maximum flexibility to develop OHV use in the existing DEIR and expansion area anyway that they desire, but it deprives the public of needed specific information about the proposed plan and its impacts. It makes a mockery of the CEQA process.

The General Plan and DEIR do not describe the project in sufficient detail; this deficiency is significant because the General Plan and DEIR specifically state that further environmental review is not required if future projects are found to be consistent with the General Plan and DEIR.  (GP 1-7; DEIR 1-2)  The General Plan does not accurately describe Existing Conditions (Chapter 2); there is no mention that a Critical Linkage Habitat Corridor runs directly through Tesla and there are no pictures of the extensive damage from OHV use in Carnegie SVRA.  (GP Chapter 2) The DEIR concludes there will be no significant impacts from converting 3,100 acres of agricultural grazing and natural resource conservation land to OHV use is not supported by evidence or analysis (DEIR Chapter 3); you only need to compare the damaging impacts from OHV use at the existing Carnegie SVRA to prove that DEIR is not credible.  The General Plan and DEIR attempt to substitute vague and un-measureable guidelines for required mitigation; the DEIR states that no mitigation beyond best management practices and unenforceable guidelines is required (DEIR Chapter 3). The DEIR does not consider any non-OHV use alternatives and the cumulative impacts from the existing Carnegie SVRA on the unique Corral Hollow ecosystem. (DEIR Chapter 4 and 6)

Opening the 3,100 acre Tesla expansion area to OHV use will result in irreparable damage its sensitive resources which include several rare plant communities and species, California Red-Legged Frog, California Tiger Salamander, Western Pond Turtle, Yellow-legged Frog, Western Spadefoot Toad, Golden Eagle, Tule Elk, Alameda Whipsnake, Townsends Big-eared Bat the historic Tesla town site and coal mine, significant features from indigenous cultures, and much more.  The Tesla expansion area is not suitable for damaging OHV use.  I oppose the expansion of Carnegie SVRA into the Tesla expansion area.  The General Plan and Draft EIR should not be approved or certified as written and need to be revised and recirculated for public review with the entire expansion area designated as a permanent preserve area with No-OHV use allowed.

(Name, address, email)

The East Bay Chapter of the California Native Plant Society strongly supports the litigation action by SPRAWLDEF and the Sierra Club, against FEMA’s surprising Record of Decision regarding fuels management in the East Bay Hills. The California Native Plant Society is a statewide organization of over 10,000 members dedicated to the preservation and appreciation of our state’s native flora. We recognize the importance of native plant communities and native plant habitats, in the intricate and complex web of life that is our natural world. Our locally evolved flora supports a rich palette of interconnected life, from the insect world to birds, amphibians and reptiles, mammals, fungi, etc. In order to allow these natural and native associations to repair themselves, and to thrive, we support the efforts of our collaborators SPRAWLDEF and the Sierra Club, in their suit against FEMA. FEMA’s Record of Decision left a confusing and murky set of unanswered questions, with unspecific parameters particularly around the management of stands of exotic eucalyptus, pine and acacia trees. We hope to see this confusion resolved in such a way as to allow complete removal of exotic trees in some specific places, so as to allow the regeneration of native species, with more manageable fire behavior characteristics. Attentive follow up weed management is a must. We believe this approach will meet the twin goals of reducing the risk of catastrophic fires, while maintaining native habitats. Also, this approach is fiscally responsible, and sustainable, whereas maintaining stands of huge exotic trees is not. The serious shortcomings and confusion of FEMA’s final Record of Decision should be re- examined and clarified, so as to allow for more responsible and effective management and stewardship of our East Bay Hills vegetation and habitats. Sincerely, Jean Robertson Conservation Committee Chair East Bay Chapter, CNPS

View of Mt. Diablo from Tesla Park

View of Mt. Diablo from Tesla Park

Con

Compare the above picture with this one showing the ongoing unmitigated habitat destruction occurring in the existing Carnegie SVRA.

On April 23rd, the California State Park’s Off-Highway Motor Vehicular Recreation Division released its new Preliminary General Plan for and accompanying Environmental Impact Report for Carnegie State Vehicular Recreation Area (CSVRA) . This plan includes the expansion of Carnegie onto 3,400 acres of wildland in eastern Alameda County (an area commonly referred to as Tesla Park). The General Plan and EIR can be found at this link: http://carnegiegeneralplan.com/document-library

EBCNPS is preparing to submit detailed comments on the plan. We are working to establish Tesla Park as a non-motorized low impact historic and natural resource park and preserve. We believe that such a designation would provide the best protection for the rare native habitats and critical wildlife corridor encompassed by the Tesla Park land while still providing recreational and educational value to the general public.

To learn more about Tesla Park and its wonderful natural resources, please visit: www.teslapark.org . While you’re there, be sure to sign up to the mailing list, like the facebook page, and consider making a donation to the effort. Also, be sure to check out our Corral Hollow Botanical Priority Protection Area description on page 12 and 13 of our BPPA Guidebook at: http://ebcnps.org/bppabotanical/GuidebookBPPA-EBCNPS-download-web.pdf

We need all the help we can get to show strong support for a non-motorized alternative land use for this area. Please, review the documents and submit comments before the deadline on June 29th. We will be sending out more info shortly so stay tuned!

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